East Indian Jewelry

East Indian Jewelry , Southwest Indian Jewelry , South Indian Jewelry , Southwestern Indian Jewelry , Northwest Indian Jewelry

Traditional Indian jewellery is as diverse as the people in the country. This is due to the disparity in the customs and traditions of the people of the regions within the country. Northwest Indian jewellery from Delhi, brought to India by the Mughals, is ornate and heavily focused on intricate designs taken from nature. Jewellery from Central India, including regions like Rajasthan, is made from Kundan and the Jadau form is found in it. This style of jewellery making involves embedding the gemstones, invariably Kundan which is a semi-opaque crystal, in a metal leaf. Also found is the Meenakari, which is another Rajasthan speciality, which involves the union of metal with different coloured lacquers. Theva, another art form, being revived by prominent Indian designers, is a coating of gold onto glass. South-western Indian jewellery includes items from southern states.

East Indian Jewelry

Gheru, from Baroda, is a prominent style of this region, in which the jewellery is given a dull red copper finish. Pachchikam, another Gujarat specialty for generations, involves holding together uncut semi-precious stones and glasswork by tiny metal claws. East Indian jewellery from Bengal, is characterized by Filligree, a style in which involves making patterns by twisting thin wires, and is found in Orissa and Andhra Pradesh. Then there is the Navrattan, traditional Bengali style jewellery comprised of nine gemstones. There is the Polki, made from uncut diamonds. South Indian jewellery from Tamil Nadu, includes temple jewellery, a speciality of Nagercoli, in south India. This style involves elaborate jewellery from 22k gold and precious stones.

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